An Update on Oregon Cannabis Legalization with Jeremy Kwit

Jeremy Kwit

In this interview with Jeremy Kwit of Bloom Well Bend http://www.bloomwellbend.com we discuss how prohibition is ending in Oregon. Specifically what legalization looks like and the key regulations that are both helping and hurting patients and growers.

Read Full Transcript

Matthew: Hi, I’m Matthew Kind. Every Monday look for a fresh new episode where I’ll take you behind the scenes and interview the insiders that are shaping the rapidly evolving cannabis industry. Learn more at www.cannainsider.com. That’s www.cannainsider.com. Are you an accredited investor looking to get access to the best cannabis investing opportunities? Join me at the next ArcView Group event. The ArcView Group is the premier angel investor network focused exclusively on the cannabis industry. There is simply no other place where you can find this quality and diversity of cannabis industry investment opportunities months or even years before the general public. If that’s not enough, you will also be networking with the top investors, entrepreneurs and thought leaders in the cannabis space. I have personally made many of my best connections and lifelong friendships at ArcView events. If you are an accredited investor and would like to join me as an ArcView member, please email me at feedback at cannainsider.com to get started. Now here’s your program.

With all the action going on around the country we often forget that recreational cannabis has been legalized in Oregon. That is why I’ve asked Jeremy Kwit, Bloom Well Cannabis Apothecary on to CannaInsider today to talk about what is happening with legalization in Oregon? Welcome to CannaInsider Jeremy.

Jeremy: Thank you. It’s great to be here.

Matthew: Jeremy to give us a sense of geography can you tell us where you are today?

Jeremy: So I’m sitting at about 3500 feet above sea level where the Cascade Mountains meet the high desert right in the center of Oregon. I’m on the East side of the Cascades, and so to the West of me are Ponderosa Pines and out East of me are Juniper Pines, and so we live in a climate that is really incredible for cannabis production especially an indoor and in climate controlled greenhouses because we have cold, dry night time air year round. Now it doesn’t hurt that it’s beautiful I think the plants like that as well and so for the same reason that Facebook and Apple opened their large data centers about 40 minutes from Bend in Prineville. Cannabis cultivation indoors is phenomenal because any time throughout the year the temperature drops to 30 to 40 degrees at night and we have a very low humidity we are super dry so we have less problems with mold, mildews, and pathogens.

Matthew: Yeah that’s a great point about the humidity level. I know the Bend has a really thriving micro-brew scene. Do you see kind of that culture now going into the cannabis scene now that people are coming out of the shadows?

Jeremy: It certainly is. We are very fortunate in Bend to have had a fairly open climate towards cannabis not just recently but even the last half dozen years where there have been dispensaries that were operational under kind of a grey model before 3460 had passed because our criminal defense; excuse me our criminal justice system didn’t see any problems with cannabis. So we are seeing now and experiencing a virgining craft cannabis industry that is growing very dynamically and we’re seeing lots of different brands of cannabis farms, processing, and edibles companies come out of Central Oregon as well as dispensaries like myself.

Matthew: Can you give us a little background on what Bloom Well Cannabis Apothecary is and your involvement in it and what you’re trying to do there?

Jeremy: Oh certainly. Bloom Well is a community dispensary that provides safe access to cannabis in a judgment free environment and I mean every bit of that statement. As a community dispensary we believe in the open source cannabis model versus the sole source cannabis model so think Len X or Nescafe’s Mozilla browser where we want to bring in a variety of different farmers’ products and processors’ product into our facility to share it with our clientele. So an alternative model for a dispensary is the sole sourced one where growers are forward integrating into retail to sell their wares directly and the alternative for us is that we bring in and represent family farmers from around our region and around our state and we procure the very best products that we can find to provide diversity for our clients and to support community based agriculture in the region.

Matthew: So I’m familiar with; I grew up Irish/Catholic so I know what a judgment rich environment is but I’ve never heard of a judgment free. What does that mean exactly?

Jeremy: Well we don’t really care why people use cannabis. So a lot of folks may come to us with a condition or with symptoms that they will talk about and that will be maybe the driving force or factor in their choice to consume cannabis as an alternative to other prescription drugs and for us we don’t judge them for the conditions that they have, for their choice and use of cannabis because a lot of people will use cannabis in a multitude of different ways and the reasoning or what they get their medical card for on paper might be different than how they end up using the product in actuality or in practice. It might become something very spiritual for them and most doctors aren’t writing a recommendation for the spiritual use of cannabis so.

Matthew: Not yet.

Jeremy: Not yet and to that point about physicians the fact that somebody has a doctor’s note or an attending physician statement in the state of Oregon doesn’t necessarily make them any more entitled in my view to their consumption of cannabis then somebody else who has been self medicating with cannabis to feel better that doesn’t have a doctor’s note. So part of the judgment free environment is even the notion that if you’re a medical cannabis cardholder you’re entitled to cannabis and if you’re using cannabis without your medical card you are somehow an outlaw. Ultimately I see people use cannabis to feel better and if they’re using cannabis to feel better that’s great and cannabis is certainly a lot better for many individuals than their consumption of alcohol or other narcotics and so I look at cannabis use as one of relaxation, enjoyment, decompression, stress reduction and that is as important then ameliorating some into a debilitating physical condition.

Matthew: Now what would you say was the spark that got you into the cannabis industry just give us a little background there because it seems like you really have a strong sense of your values around cannabis and I kind of want to get; how did that happen?

Jeremy: So as a teenager I distinctively remember my mom invading my sister’s privacy and going into her bedroom and finding a note in her drawer where she wrote that to a friend that she had tried using cannabis at a Madonna concert, and my mom was incredibly upset and of course grounded my sister and punished her for her experimentation with cannabis and I remember the dialogue that I had with my mom saying I felt that it was invasive of her privacy and inappropriate to have discovered this note in her drawer. My mom responded with a statement similar to but Jeremy she was experimenting with marijuana and it struck me well one a Madonna concert is the perfect place for somebody to try marijuana as opposed to the parking lot at school because the reality is somebody probably passed her a joint and she tried it. Took a puff and it wasn’t a big deal.

But my mom turned it into a big deal and so it struck me then that sort of the reefer madness mentality can be really divisive inside of families and now 25 years later my mom and my sister are still struggling to rebuild trust in their relationship and I felt that that sort of instance with cannabis was what initiated the ball rolling from my mom creating a police state like environment in our household to preventing dialogue and conversation about cannabis and choice and for me personally I also experimented with cannabis in my youth but chose to be very private about it because I knew my mom’s attitude and there is nothing worse than children and their parents having walls of secrecy between them and so I sensed that our historically terrible drug policy has a traumatic effect on our youth and our family structure.

Matthew: Yeah that’s a good point I mean everybody knows they’ve seen pictures of DEA destroying plants and breaking down doors and using flash grenades and all these things but then there’s a trickle down staucy component of it where you’re family then becomes militant in preventing these things mostly from miseducation and kind of brainwashing. I don’t know another way of saying it.

Jeremy : I would agree. There’s a lot of research that shows I think that the Drug Policy Alliance has a publication on their website called “Beyond Zero Tolerance” and it’s a fact based guide to drug education for parents and it uses a lot of research from a PhD, I believe his name was Rod Stryker that shows that having an open relationship and open dialogue with children or youth about cannabis and all drugs for that matter is going to produce better outcomes. So rather than saying that cannabis is terrible don’t never use it well young people will try it and they’ll find out that it wasn’t the end of the world and then they now realize that their parents lied to them, their teachers lied to them, and so did their school administration and officials.

So rather engage in conversation about use of cannabis and that will allow parents to be more able to distinguish the difference between experimental use and abuse and again forging lines of communication instead of creating barriers of secrecy is going to help kids to stay sober and that’s what I would want for everybody. Now that also applies to adults as well let’s just be honest with one another about what we’re doing with ourselves and our bodies.

Matthew: So true. We’re going to get into the Oregon legalization here in a second but I call cannabis the gateway truth not the gateway drug because after I experienced it for the first time I realized hey wait a minute here this is a total lie what this plants about. It feels totally different then everything I was told and then my next thought is what else are we being lied to about. So that’s why it’s the gateway truth because then you start pulling at the string like wait a second if cannabis is not this evil plant in fact it has all these medicinal benefits and therapeutic benefits and it helps life in many ways. If it’s such a 180 lie about this what else are we being lied to about? So when you pull up that string it’s fun but dangerous at the same time and you tend to go down the road less traveled.

Jeremy: Mm-hmm (affirmative). Yeah you start questioning everything our government is telling us and where does our government come from? Culturally the Puritan’s started America and they were trying to flee persecution in England so they could practice a much more stringent or religious ideology and I think that Puritanical culture still is very much pervasive and has an influence on us today. There’s something wrong with our country that says it’s not okay for you to feel good.

Matthew: Right.

Jeremy: And we have been self medicating with; throughout human history. We’ve been always trying to change how we feel and that could be through fermented beverages, it could be through sleep and food deprivation, it could be through twirling around in a circle reciting Turkish poetry. We’re trying to change sort of our ontology and the way in which we look at the world around us in some ways and it can be temporary or permanent and I think cannabis helps many individuals provide a different lens through which to experience their reality and look at the world around them.

So for me personally I’ve had a spine injury and I was originally turned onto medical cannabis in the Bay area back in the late 90s after Prop 215 was passed in California and folks had suggested that cannabis provides natural analogies and anti-inflammatory properties so should be really wonderful the bulged disc in my spine and I found that sometimes when I was using cannabis that I certainly did feel some pain relief but what I also found is that more than anything else while I was trying to stretch or do physical therapy the cannabis helped me to be present in my body and relax and find sort of the source of pain and allowed me to stretch out because my own Type A personality; I had always characterized myself as almost having ADHD with OCD tendencies. I can’t sit still for a minute let alone for forty-five minutes to an hour to do physical therapy so the cannabis just allowed me to relax and sit still and it didn’t always solve the back pain but my own ability to relax and sit still with cannabis was incredibly therapeutic.

Matthew: Yeah. Well that’s great context for your background. Now switching gears a little bit to Oregon and legalization first what was the vote, what happened, and where are we at now?

Jeremy: So Oregon started its medical cannabis program back in 1998 and the program was based or modeled on sharing where a grower could grow six plants for a patient and the patient could provide some reimbursement to the grower not for their labor but for their materials and supplies. And so it was very much based on a trading system and so the challenge though you know if cannabis helps to settle your stomach or for example I use if dairy or yogurt or kefir settles your GI tract issues you would then have to go find a dairy farmer who could have six cows and they would give you a quart of milk a month and if you realized that maybe dairy milk upset your tummy and you needed a shot of raw goat milk a day how are you going to find a goat shepherd?

And the same thing was true for patients and growers throughout Oregon that it was hard for patients to find growers. So that evolved into the recognition by legislatures that patients need a store, need a dispensary to go procure their cannabis. So 3460 passed by the legislature in 2013 and it was signed into law and implementation started in 2014. So Bloom Well applied for its license and has been in good standing since we opened our facility serving medical cannabis patients. The more recent activity in the state of Oregon was with the passage of Measure 91 last November that made or that is seeking to make cannabis fully legal for adults over the age of 21 and that passed last November. A joint task force to implement Measure 91 was put together by the legislature and they’ve been enhancing some of the guidelines that Measure 91 put forth.

What they did very recently was introduce some legislation called HP3400 which was signed into law by our Governor recently as well that is actually going to allow medical marijuana dispensaries like Bloom Well to start selling cannabis to all adults twenty-one and over this October and they’re calling it Early Interim Recreational Sales. Early because the Oregon Liquor Control Commission is still writing the regulations that will govern recreational production. Seed to sale processing and distribution as well as retailing and the implementation of the OLCC Recreational Cannabis stores is not expected to be fully rolled out until October 2016 at the earliest and so then the legislature recognized well where are individuals; where are adults going to buy cannabis before 2016? If we don’t allow medical marijuana dispensaries to sell them flower then they’re going to procure it in the alternative marketplace. So starting this October medical marijuana dispensaries if they choose to will be able to sell a quarter ounce of flower or bud to adults 21 and over per day as well as seeds and 4 plants.

So this July a few months ago in Oregon cannabis became decriminalized. So it is now legal in Oregon for adults 21 and over to have 8 ounces of cannabis in the home, 1 ounce of cannabis out of home, and they can have 4 plants. And I say that it was decriminalized in July because it’s not truly legal unless you can go buy it somewhere so the possession of cannabis became okay this July and what’s also really wonderful is they’re changing a lot of the sentencing guidelines and the I don’t know what it’s called the different; they’re rescheduling different types of misdemeanors and felonies and so it will also affect everybody who is presently jailed for cannabis related crimes and many people will be able to leave jail and have their records expunged starting this past July.

Matthew: Oh interesting.

Jeremy: So we will be able to now sell cannabis. Gosh two weeks from now I’m both incredibly nervous and excited about the amount of work that we have to do to gear up to be able to sell cannabis flowers, seeds, and up to four clones to any adult who walks into our door starting October 1st.

Matthew: Is there a limit on the number of seeds that can be sold?

Jeremy: Unlimited number of seeds.

Matthew: Wow. That is really cool. Awesome and do you anticipate a lot of demand for the seeds and clones? What’s the word on the street there?

Jeremy: I think there’s; I mean I think there’s going to be a lot more demand for flower for the bud. I think after prohibition most people wanted to consume alcohol not everybody wanted to suddenly become home distillers and home brewers. That being said I do recognize that there is already and will continue to be a surge in demand or desire to cultivate cannabis at home and we had some clients who came in gentleman probably in his late 70s or 80s just bought a cannabis plant because he wanted to hold it and he and his wife stood outside. They took pictures in front of our sign and so there’s something incredibly dignifying about being able to have choice about the type of cannabis that you’re buying as well as the ability to grow it at home for yourself and so it’s a lot like tomatoes. A lot of people will grow tomatoes at home but they still buy tomatoes in the marketplace.

You can build soil beds and build hoop houses and build your tomato garden and you’re tomatoes are just going to taste the best that anybody’s ever produced and you’re going to share them with your neighbors and I think that’s going to happen with cannabis as well and those folks that love to make salad will also go to the stores and buy plenty of tomatoes as well.

Matthew: How do you feel in general about the way regulations are being rolled out? You gave us a nice summary there but in some other states the regulators create rules that don’t allow for a functional market in some ways. Is there any ways it could be different?

Jeremy: We’re really lucky in Oregon because we have had Washington and Colorado as models and so the folks Anthony Johnson and Dave Coppolack [ph] who were the chief petitioners and co-authors of Measure 91. They looked at those models as they were crafting Measure 91 and Measure 91 is very much modeled after Oregon Craft Beer and Wine different than alcohol. You know hard alcohol is sort of owned by the state. It has a different sort of regulatory and distribution system and so the intention is to create a truly craft cannabis culture so that family farmers from around the state can benefit and small craft producers will thrive and so we’ve got this dynamic craft beer and wine industry in Oregon that is doing quite well and cannabis I expect it to follow in a similar pattern in Oregon and that’s because we’ve got a very well written; we had a very well written measure.

Of course I think the legislature made some modifications to Measure 91 allowing municipalities to opt out of commercial cannabis and so in areas of the state like Bend in Deschutes county or Portland in Multnomah county we’re going to see cannabis havens where the municipalities are choosing to regulate cannabis in a way that makes sense for their communities rather than opt out with moratoriums and bans and because of this recent legislative tweak to Measure 91 under the guise of 3400. And it was through a lot of lobbying from the Oregon League of Cities and the County’s Association to allow more conservative count as in conservative cities to choose to opt out of commercial cannabis which could include cultivation, processing, distribution, or retailing.

And Measure 91 was designed to encourage small communities to participate in this system because if you don’t have a retail component there’s no cannabis businesses operating in your city or county you’re not going to get the tax revenues that come from the taxation of cannabis which is allocated towards the school general fund and local policing. So I’m in a very unique and lucky; fortunate position geographically because I’m operating in a community that is tolerate of cannabis but unfortunately very close by Crook County for example they’ve chosen to opt out and it’s really unfortunate because they, they’ve got in Central Oregon we refer to Crook County as a banana belt because it’s got really wonderful weather, it’s very sunny and rather than farmers producing Kentucky Bluegrass they could produce cannabis instead but they’re not going to be able to do so because their community or their county commissioners have opted out. So we’re going to end up with a bit of a quilt around the state of Oregon unfortunately.

Matthew: What about edibles and infused products? Where do those stand?

Jeremy: Medical cannabis patients can consume those in October. We will not be able to sell edibles to adult consumers 21 and over which is quite ridiculous. The edibles in Oregon; all products actually that is running through or sold through a dispensaries has to be tested for safety and potency. So on the safety side that’s mold, mildew, and pesticide testing and then on the potency side it’s the amount of THC and CBD for flowers. The percentage in those products and for finished products like hash oil concentrates or edibles the total amount of THC and CBD has to be determined and so as a consequence it’s very easy for us to dose our edibles.

We have edibles like hard candies and chocolates and savory snacks and we know the dosages is between 4 mg per candy up to 40 or 140 and so we encourage people to find their dose and through some experimentation everybody can quite easily figure out how much cannabis is appropriate for them in an edible dosage form and so we find our clients really enjoying their consumption of cannabis as an edible because it may be more discrete or actually we just might be more long lasting and have a different physical or an emotional effect on themselves. So edibles are great. We can sell them. I would characterize edibles as maybe 25% of our business and unfortunately we won’t be able to sell them to adults 21 and over.

Matthew: Right just for medical then and is there talk of changing that or is it too early to say?

Jeremy: There’s no discussion that I’m aware of regarding such change. I think that there’s been some edible hysteria in the media and then some of that are from instances in Colorado or there’s even an instance here in Central Oregon where a woman called the ambulance for her friend because she had three candies and felt herself getting really, really sick, and so I think there’s been some media hysteria but like anything else when somebody; like alcohol if you’re learning to drink alcohol you don’t introduce your friend to alcohol and provide them with a fifth of Tequila.

Matthew: Right.

Jeremy: Somebody is going to get sick with alcohol well the same thing can happen with cannabis. We’re aware of that and if you introduce cannabis to somebody who’s already drunk then the likelihood of them having a negative first experience is pretty darned good, but we encourage people to try edibles with a 3 to 5 mg dose. We have a line of medicated ginger-ale’s called Magic Numbers and they come in a 3 mg, a 10mg, and a 25mg bottle, and so I personally know based on my size and metabolism that 3 mg is perfect and it’s really awesome because I can drink a whole bottle and feel like a complete human that I’ve finished my beverage and I feel a nice effect without feeling debilitated in any way and other individuals that have a different size, stature, and metabolism will want 10 mg or 25 mg dose.

We have a line of medicated (28:40 Cambushas?) that have 15 mgs per bottle and so people can find their dose. You realize well drink a third of the bottle and your good or two thirds and your fine and so we have the ability to control our dosages if we’re conscientious about it and ultimately that’s what we’re talking about here. We’re trying to sell cannabis to adult consumers who are rational, who are self aware, who are responsible and idiots are going to do stupid things with anything. There are people who self medicate or who over medicate with sugar and caffeine and have eating disorders and all sorts of problems and cannabis isn’t going to prevent somebody from abusing it but for the other ninety-nine. something percent of humanity they’re going to be fine with their choice of consumption of cannabis as a smoked or vaped flower in an edible form or in a hash oil concentrate.

Matthew: Did you find yourself educating new customers about the endocannabinoid system and if so how do you introduce that subject to them?

Jeremy: I would characterize our audience as maybe one third really well knowledgeable about the plant and their consumption of the plant and they come to use seeking variety, different novel dosage forms from edibles and concentrates as well, and I would say there’s another third of our audience that has a relationship to cannabis but they’re not trying to learn more about its use and different ways that they can incorporate cannabis and different types of cannabis into their overall health and wellness and then there’s another third of our clientele that are absolutely new to cannabis.

So two thirds of our audience is seeking knowledge, they’re seeking education and consultation about how cannabis can be used more appropriately, and so we do talk about the endocannabinoid system and that’s often where we lead in the conversation because a lot of time folks are seeking an answer because Western medicine has typically said okay if you take this product your headache will go away, if you take this product your belly ache will go away and so some folks are seeking sort of that clear cut black or white answer. With cannabis I want a strain that provides me with this sense of relief and we’re very honest and we recognize that everybody has an endocannabinoid system that’s very different and that endocannabinoid receptor cell or the endocannabinoid receptors are in our cell walls. They are our nerve endings and therefore cannabis is a smart plant and it will go.

The cannabis oils are cannabinoids we’ll go to where the body needs it most. That could be in your gut? That could be in your head? It could be in sort of the neuropathic pain in your feet and so we are always encouraging people and folks to try and experiment with different types of cannabis because the different ratios in the cannabinoids are going to react differently to everybody and often when we’re in a trade room and there’s a number of individuals whether it’s our staff or our clients we’re honest and say hey all of us can consume the same cannabis plant but it’s going to produce a different reaction. It might make you sleepy Matt, it might make me wanna go reorganize all the tubbys in my garage, and it might open somebody’s heart and inspire them to write love letters to their love; their friends and family and loved ones.

So the endocannabinoid system is complex and has recently discovered and all of us have a very unique one and so it’s; again we’re using our own bodies as an experiment to find out what works best for us and when.

Matthew: Are topicals in the same category as infused products or are they allowed for adult use or is it medical how does that work?

Jeremy: So topicals ironically are considered an infused or a concentrated dosage form of cannabis and will not be available to sell to adult consumers in October just a quarter ounce of bud is all we’re going to be able to sell with respect to cannabis products to adults. We find a lot of our clients using topicals very successfully and I.

Matthew: What are the symptoms? Would you say they’re using them for?

Jeremy: Well we opened our doors about a year and a half ago and I had no idea how many in our culture suffered from migraines and insomnia and we have a lot of clients who will use topicals before; while their sensing themselves getting a migraine. They’ll rub topical salve on their temples to prevent the onset of the migraine and they say they wake up feeling a lot better maybe 90% better with a lot of the migraine being avoided and we also see clients using topicals applying it to sore parts of their body from places where they have achy muscles or joint pain and their finding tremendous relief from salves or from roll on oils that are infused with cannabis oils; often blends of different cannabis oils as well as a blend of other healing herbs and healing oils. We see clients using topical lotions and salves to address a variety of different symptoms.

Matthew: How about patients do they consume cannabis leaves by juicing? Is that something you hear of?

Jeremy: We do hear of that quite a lot and what we often will do for clients who are seeking leaf to juice we will just try and introduce them to growers or cultivators directly because it’s a very time sensitive product. If somebody does a lot of defanning or defan leafing in their garden those families need to get into the juicer immediately and because what I had indicated earlier everything that comes in our facility has to be tested by an analytical firm for safety and potency it would be prohibitively costly to have a big bag of leaf tested for mold and pesticides as well as potency because the amount of juice. You get two ice cube; an ice cube tray potentially worth of juice. So it’s not really economical or viable for us to do that through our facility but because we’re a community agency and a community dispensary we just introduce patients to growers and through the original sharing model growers will just share their leaves directly with patients and we hear amazing stories about the benefits of the juiced leaf. It’s very high in THCA which is the acidic form of THC. It’s non psychoactive and we hear a lot of folks benefiting tremendously with respect to their digestive systems and their overall health and well being.

Matthew: Now a lot of people listening would like to hear more about cannabis from their doctor but their doctors are not really bringing up the subject. Is there; do you have any suggestions on how to initiate that conversation with their medical doctor?

Jeremy: Be forthright. There’s nothing wrong or illegal about discussing medical cannabis with a doctor under the (36:38 Conna?) decision the federal courts have already ruled that doctors and patients have a confidentiality and therefore they have the ability to discuss medical cannabis and certainly recommend it to their patients. Doctors are very I think accustomed to patients bringing ideas to them about different treatment options and preferences and cannabis therapeutics shouldn’t be any different. The challenge is that many doctors are unfamiliar with cannabis or dosing with cannabis and therefore might be hesitant to recommend it so a patient should bring in documentation, research about cannabis used medically as well as some documentation that describes or information that would be beneficial for the physician to understand how the patient has been using cannabis with benefit or what they hear about other patients using cannabis for.

There is a organization that does a lot of great work in policy called “Americans For Safe Access” and they have a website called www.safeaccessnow.org and there are articles out of their website that talk about how to talk to your doctor about cannabis and we often encourage our own clients or folks that call us on the phone or walk in our door and say hey I want to; I’m interested in learning more about medical cannabis and I want to get a recommendation and I don’t know who to go and who to talk to and we always encourage folks to speak to their primary care physicians first and foremost and have that conversation with their physician because I would think that physicians want to know what their patients are using because it might affect their regular prescribing habits. Certain medications are dampened with the use of cannabis and then others have the opposite effect and so a physician may want to dial up certain types of medications or dial them down if they know that cannabis is being used in concert with ongoing treatment. And we recognize that not every physician is going to be comfortable recommending cannabis because of their own morals or because of their own sense of comfort and knowledge about the plant and there are often alternative; there are other doctors that are cannabis specialists that will then be willing to be engaged with a patient to see if cannabis could be appropriate for their consumption and their use medically.

Matthew: Great points Jeremy. In closing how can listeners learn more about Bloom Well?

Jeremy: We always love it when people come right into our facility but knowing that not everybody is in Bend, Oregon we do have a website which is www.bloomwellbend.com and we can also be found on Instagram and other social media places like Facebook, we’re on Leafly as well and a quick search for bloomwellbend will find us on any of the social media sites as well.

Matthew: Great. Jeremy thanks so much for being on CannaInsider today. We really appreciate it.

Jeremy: Oh it’s been a pleasure.

Matthew: : If you enjoyed the show today, please consider leaving us a review on iTunes, Stitcher or whatever app you might be using to listen to the show. Every five star review helps us to bring the best guests to you. Learn more at www.cannainsider.com/itunes. What are the five major trends that will impact the cannabis industry in the next five years? Find out with your free report at www.cannainsider.com/trends. Have a suggestion for an awesome guest on www.cannainsider.com, simply send us an email at feedback at cannainsider.com. We would love to hear from you.

Some quick disclosures and disclaimers, me your host works with the ArcView Group and promotional consideration may or may not be given to CannaInsider for the ads placed in the show. Also please do not take any information from CannaInsider or its guests as medical advice. Contact your licensed physician before taking cannabis or using it for medical treatments. Lastly the host or guests on CannaInsider may or may not invest in the companies or entrepreneurs profiled on the show. Please consult your licensed financial advisor before making any investment decisions.

Key Takeaways:
[3:42] – Background on Bloom Well Cannabis Apothecary
[5:01] – Jeremy talks about a judgment free environment
[7:14] – Jeremy talks about how he got into the cannabis industry
[15:08] – Jeremy discusses the legalization process in Oregon
[20:09] – Jeremy discusses the demand for seeds and clones in Oregon
[21:51] – Jeremy talks about regulation in Oregon
[25:09] – Jeremy talks about edibles and infused products
[29:43] – Jeremy discusses introducing customers to the endocannabinoid system
[32:38] – Jeremy talks about topicals
[34:30] – Consumption by “juicing”
[36:28] – Initiating a conversation with your doctor about cannabis use
[29:20] – Bloom Well’s contact details

What are The Five Tends That Will Disrupt The Cannabis Industry

(Hint: It’s not about legalization)
Click this link to get your free report on the five disruptive trends.
http://www.cannainsider.com/trends

Read Full Transcript

Matthew: Hi, I’m Matthew Kind. Every Monday look for a fresh new episode where I’ll take you behind the scenes and interview the insiders that are shaping the rapidly evolving cannabis industry. Learn more at www.cannainsider.com. That’s www.cannainsider.com. Are you an accredited investor looking to get access to the best cannabis investing opportunities? Join me at the next ArcView Group event. The ArcView Group is the premier angel investor network focused exclusively on the cannabis industry. There is simply no other place where you can find this quality and diversity of cannabis industry investment opportunities months or even years before the general public. If that’s not enough, you will also be networking with the top investors, entrepreneurs and thought leaders in the cannabis space. I have personally made many of my best connections and lifelong friendships at ArcView events. If you are an accredited investor and would like to join me as an ArcView member, please email me at feedback at cannainsider.com to get started. Now here’s your program.

With all the action going on around the country we often forget that recreational cannabis has been legalized in Oregon. That is why I’ve asked Jeremy Kwit, Bloom Well Cannabis Apothecary on to CannaInsider today to talk about what is happening with legalization in Oregon? Welcome to CannaInsider Jeremy.

Jeremy: Thank you. It’s great to be here.

Matthew: Jeremy to give us a sense of geography can you tell us where you are today?

Jeremy: So I’m sitting at about 3500 feet above sea level where the Cascade Mountains meet the high desert right in the center of Oregon. I’m on the East side of the Cascades, and so to the West of me are Ponderosa Pines and out East of me are Juniper Pines, and so we live in a climate that is really incredible for cannabis production especially an indoor and in climate controlled greenhouses because we have cold, dry night time air year round. Now it doesn’t hurt that it’s beautiful I think the plants like that as well and so for the same reason that Facebook and Apple opened their large data centers about 40 minutes from Bend in Prineville. Cannabis cultivation indoors is phenomenal because any time throughout the year the temperature drops to 30 to 40 degrees at night and we have a very low humidity we are super dry so we have less problems with mold, mildews, and pathogens.

Matthew: Yeah that’s a great point about the humidity level. I know the Bend has a really thriving micro-brew scene. Do you see kind of that culture now going into the cannabis scene now that people are coming out of the shadows?

Jeremy: It certainly is. We are very fortunate in Bend to have had a fairly open climate towards cannabis not just recently but even the last half dozen years where there have been dispensaries that were operational under kind of a grey model before 3460 had passed because our criminal defense; excuse me our criminal justice system didn’t see any problems with cannabis. So we are seeing now and experiencing a virgining craft cannabis industry that is growing very dynamically and we’re seeing lots of different brands of cannabis farms, processing, and edibles companies come out of Central Oregon as well as dispensaries like myself.

Matthew: Can you give us a little background on what Bloom Well Cannabis Apothecary is and your involvement in it and what you’re trying to do there?

Jeremy: Oh certainly. Bloom Well is a community dispensary that provides safe access to cannabis in a judgment free environment and I mean every bit of that statement. As a community dispensary we believe in the open source cannabis model versus the sole source cannabis model so think Len X or Nescafe’s Mozilla browser where we want to bring in a variety of different farmers’ products and processors’ product into our facility to share it with our clientele. So an alternative model for a dispensary is the sole sourced one where growers are forward integrating into retail to sell their wares directly and the alternative for us is that we bring in and represent family farmers from around our region and around our state and we procure the very best products that we can find to provide diversity for our clients and to support community based agriculture in the region.

Matthew: So I’m familiar with; I grew up Irish/Catholic so I know what a judgment rich environment is but I’ve never heard of a judgment free. What does that mean exactly?

Jeremy: Well we don’t really care why people use cannabis. So a lot of folks may come to us with a condition or with symptoms that they will talk about and that will be maybe the driving force or factor in their choice to consume cannabis as an alternative to other prescription drugs and for us we don’t judge them for the conditions that they have, for their choice and use of cannabis because a lot of people will use cannabis in a multitude of different ways and the reasoning or what they get their medical card for on paper might be different than how they end up using the product in actuality or in practice. It might become something very spiritual for them and most doctors aren’t writing a recommendation for the spiritual use of cannabis so.

Matthew: Not yet.

Jeremy: Not yet and to that point about physicians the fact that somebody has a doctor’s note or an attending physician statement in the state of Oregon doesn’t necessarily make them any more entitled in my view to their consumption of cannabis then somebody else who has been self medicating with cannabis to feel better that doesn’t have a doctor’s note. So part of the judgment free environment is even the notion that if you’re a medical cannabis cardholder you’re entitled to cannabis and if you’re using cannabis without your medical card you are somehow an outlaw. Ultimately I see people use cannabis to feel better and if they’re using cannabis to feel better that’s great and cannabis is certainly a lot better for many individuals than their consumption of alcohol or other narcotics and so I look at cannabis use as one of relaxation, enjoyment, decompression, stress reduction and that is as important then ameliorating some into a debilitating physical condition.

Matthew: Now what would you say was the spark that got you into the cannabis industry just give us a little background there because it seems like you really have a strong sense of your values around cannabis and I kind of want to get; how did that happen?

Jeremy: So as a teenager I distinctively remember my mom invading my sister’s privacy and going into her bedroom and finding a note in her drawer where she wrote that to a friend that she had tried using cannabis at a Madonna concert, and my mom was incredibly upset and of course grounded my sister and punished her for her experimentation with cannabis and I remember the dialogue that I had with my mom saying I felt that it was invasive of her privacy and inappropriate to have discovered this note in her drawer. My mom responded with a statement similar to but Jeremy she was experimenting with marijuana and it struck me well one a Madonna concert is the perfect place for somebody to try marijuana as opposed to the parking lot at school because the reality is somebody probably passed her a joint and she tried it. Took a puff and it wasn’t a big deal.

But my mom turned it into a big deal and so it struck me then that sort of the reefer madness mentality can be really divisive inside of families and now 25 years later my mom and my sister are still struggling to rebuild trust in their relationship and I felt that that sort of instance with cannabis was what initiated the ball rolling from my mom creating a police state like environment in our household to preventing dialogue and conversation about cannabis and choice and for me personally I also experimented with cannabis in my youth but chose to be very private about it because I knew my mom’s attitude and there is nothing worse than children and their parents having walls of secrecy between them and so I sensed that our historically terrible drug policy has a traumatic effect on our youth and our family structure.

Matthew: Yeah that’s a good point I mean everybody knows they’ve seen pictures of DEA destroying plants and breaking down doors and using flash grenades and all these things but then there’s a trickle down staucy component of it where you’re family then becomes militant in preventing these things mostly from miseducation and kind of brainwashing. I don’t know another way of saying it.

Jeremy : I would agree. There’s a lot of research that shows I think that the Drug Policy Alliance has a publication on their website called “Beyond Zero Tolerance” and it’s a fact based guide to drug education for parents and it uses a lot of research from a PhD, I believe his name was Rod Stryker that shows that having an open relationship and open dialogue with children or youth about cannabis and all drugs for that matter is going to produce better outcomes. So rather than saying that cannabis is terrible don’t never use it well young people will try it and they’ll find out that it wasn’t the end of the world and then they now realize that their parents lied to them, their teachers lied to them, and so did their school administration and officials.

So rather engage in conversation about use of cannabis and that will allow parents to be more able to distinguish the difference between experimental use and abuse and again forging lines of communication instead of creating barriers of secrecy is going to help kids to stay sober and that’s what I would want for everybody. Now that also applies to adults as well let’s just be honest with one another about what we’re doing with ourselves and our bodies.

Matthew: So true. We’re going to get into the Oregon legalization here in a second but I call cannabis the gateway truth not the gateway drug because after I experienced it for the first time I realized hey wait a minute here this is a total lie what this plants about. It feels totally different then everything I was told and then my next thought is what else are we being lied to about. So that’s why it’s the gateway truth because then you start pulling at the string like wait a second if cannabis is not this evil plant in fact it has all these medicinal benefits and therapeutic benefits and it helps life in many ways. If it’s such a 180 lie about this what else are we being lied to about? So when you pull up that string it’s fun but dangerous at the same time and you tend to go down the road less traveled.

Jeremy: Mm-hmm (affirmative). Yeah you start questioning everything our government is telling us and where does our government come from? Culturally the Puritan’s started America and they were trying to flee persecution in England so they could practice a much more stringent or religious ideology and I think that Puritanical culture still is very much pervasive and has an influence on us today. There’s something wrong with our country that says it’s not okay for you to feel good.

Matthew: Right.

Jeremy: And we have been self medicating with; throughout human history. We’ve been always trying to change how we feel and that could be through fermented beverages, it could be through sleep and food deprivation, it could be through twirling around in a circle reciting Turkish poetry. We’re trying to change sort of our ontology and the way in which we look at the world around us in some ways and it can be temporary or permanent and I think cannabis helps many individuals provide a different lens through which to experience their reality and look at the world around them.

So for me personally I’ve had a spine injury and I was originally turned onto medical cannabis in the Bay area back in the late 90s after Prop 215 was passed in California and folks had suggested that cannabis provides natural analogies and anti-inflammatory properties so should be really wonderful the bulged disc in my spine and I found that sometimes when I was using cannabis that I certainly did feel some pain relief but what I also found is that more than anything else while I was trying to stretch or do physical therapy the cannabis helped me to be present in my body and relax and find sort of the source of pain and allowed me to stretch out because my own Type A personality; I had always characterized myself as almost having ADHD with OCD tendencies. I can’t sit still for a minute let alone for forty-five minutes to an hour to do physical therapy so the cannabis just allowed me to relax and sit still and it didn’t always solve the back pain but my own ability to relax and sit still with cannabis was incredibly therapeutic.

Matthew: Yeah. Well that’s great context for your background. Now switching gears a little bit to Oregon and legalization first what was the vote, what happened, and where are we at now?

Jeremy: So Oregon started its medical cannabis program back in 1998 and the program was based or modeled on sharing where a grower could grow six plants for a patient and the patient could provide some reimbursement to the grower not for their labor but for their materials and supplies. And so it was very much based on a trading system and so the challenge though you know if cannabis helps to settle your stomach or for example I use if dairy or yogurt or kefir settles your GI tract issues you would then have to go find a dairy farmer who could have six cows and they would give you a quart of milk a month and if you realized that maybe dairy milk upset your tummy and you needed a shot of raw goat milk a day how are you going to find a goat shepherd?

And the same thing was true for patients and growers throughout Oregon that it was hard for patients to find growers. So that evolved into the recognition by legislatures that patients need a store, need a dispensary to go procure their cannabis. So 3460 passed by the legislature in 2013 and it was signed into law and implementation started in 2014. So Bloom Well applied for its license and has been in good standing since we opened our facility serving medical cannabis patients. The more recent activity in the state of Oregon was with the passage of Measure 91 last November that made or that is seeking to make cannabis fully legal for adults over the age of 21 and that passed last November. A joint task force to implement Measure 91 was put together by the legislature and they’ve been enhancing some of the guidelines that Measure 91 put forth.

What they did very recently was introduce some legislation called HP3400 which was signed into law by our Governor recently as well that is actually going to allow medical marijuana dispensaries like Bloom Well to start selling cannabis to all adults twenty-one and over this October and they’re calling it Early Interim Recreational Sales. Early because the Oregon Liquor Control Commission is still writing the regulations that will govern recreational production. Seed to sale processing and distribution as well as retailing and the implementation of the OLCC Recreational Cannabis stores is not expected to be fully rolled out until October 2016 at the earliest and so then the legislature recognized well where are individuals; where are adults going to buy cannabis before 2016? If we don’t allow medical marijuana dispensaries to sell them flower then they’re going to procure it in the alternative marketplace. So starting this October medical marijuana dispensaries if they choose to will be able to sell a quarter ounce of flower or bud to adults 21 and over per day as well as seeds and 4 plants.

So this July a few months ago in Oregon cannabis became decriminalized. So it is now legal in Oregon for adults 21 and over to have 8 ounces of cannabis in the home, 1 ounce of cannabis out of home, and they can have 4 plants. And I say that it was decriminalized in July because it’s not truly legal unless you can go buy it somewhere so the possession of cannabis became okay this July and what’s also really wonderful is they’re changing a lot of the sentencing guidelines and the I don’t know what it’s called the different; they’re rescheduling different types of misdemeanors and felonies and so it will also affect everybody who is presently jailed for cannabis related crimes and many people will be able to leave jail and have their records expunged starting this past July.

Matthew: Oh interesting.

Jeremy: So we will be able to now sell cannabis. Gosh two weeks from now I’m both incredibly nervous and excited about the amount of work that we have to do to gear up to be able to sell cannabis flowers, seeds, and up to four clones to any adult who walks into our door starting October 1st.

Matthew: Is there a limit on the number of seeds that can be sold?

Jeremy: Unlimited number of seeds.

Matthew: Wow. That is really cool. Awesome and do you anticipate a lot of demand for the seeds and clones? What’s the word on the street there?

Jeremy: I think there’s; I mean I think there’s going to be a lot more demand for flower for the bud. I think after prohibition most people wanted to consume alcohol not everybody wanted to suddenly become home distillers and home brewers. That being said I do recognize that there is already and will continue to be a surge in demand or desire to cultivate cannabis at home and we had some clients who came in gentleman probably in his late 70s or 80s just bought a cannabis plant because he wanted to hold it and he and his wife stood outside. They took pictures in front of our sign and so there’s something incredibly dignifying about being able to have choice about the type of cannabis that you’re buying as well as the ability to grow it at home for yourself and so it’s a lot like tomatoes. A lot of people will grow tomatoes at home but they still buy tomatoes in the marketplace.

You can build soil beds and build hoop houses and build your tomato garden and you’re tomatoes are just going to taste the best that anybody’s ever produced and you’re going to share them with your neighbors and I think that’s going to happen with cannabis as well and those folks that love to make salad will also go to the stores and buy plenty of tomatoes as well.

Matthew: How do you feel in general about the way regulations are being rolled out? You gave us a nice summary there but in some other states the regulators create rules that don’t allow for a functional market in some ways. Is there any ways it could be different?

Jeremy: We’re really lucky in Oregon because we have had Washington and Colorado as models and so the folks Anthony Johnson and Dave Coppolack [ph] who were the chief petitioners and co-authors of Measure 91. They looked at those models as they were crafting Measure 91 and Measure 91 is very much modeled after Oregon Craft Beer and Wine different than alcohol. You know hard alcohol is sort of owned by the state. It has a different sort of regulatory and distribution system and so the intention is to create a truly craft cannabis culture so that family farmers from around the state can benefit and small craft producers will thrive and so we’ve got this dynamic craft beer and wine industry in Oregon that is doing quite well and cannabis I expect it to follow in a similar pattern in Oregon and that’s because we’ve got a very well written; we had a very well written measure.

Of course I think the legislature made some modifications to Measure 91 allowing municipalities to opt out of commercial cannabis and so in areas of the state like Bend in Deschutes county or Portland in Multnomah county we’re going to see cannabis havens where the municipalities are choosing to regulate cannabis in a way that makes sense for their communities rather than opt out with moratoriums and bans and because of this recent legislative tweak to Measure 91 under the guise of 3400. And it was through a lot of lobbying from the Oregon League of Cities and the County’s Association to allow more conservative count as in conservative cities to choose to opt out of commercial cannabis which could include cultivation, processing, distribution, or retailing.

And Measure 91 was designed to encourage small communities to participate in this system because if you don’t have a retail component there’s no cannabis businesses operating in your city or county you’re not going to get the tax revenues that come from the taxation of cannabis which is allocated towards the school general fund and local policing. So I’m in a very unique and lucky; fortunate position geographically because I’m operating in a community that is tolerate of cannabis but unfortunately very close by Crook County for example they’ve chosen to opt out and it’s really unfortunate because they, they’ve got in Central Oregon we refer to Crook County as a banana belt because it’s got really wonderful weather, it’s very sunny and rather than farmers producing Kentucky Bluegrass they could produce cannabis instead but they’re not going to be able to do so because their community or their county commissioners have opted out. So we’re going to end up with a bit of a quilt around the state of Oregon unfortunately.

Matthew: What about edibles and infused products? Where do those stand?

Jeremy: Medical cannabis patients can consume those in October. We will not be able to sell edibles to adult consumers 21 and over which is quite ridiculous. The edibles in Oregon; all products actually that is running through or sold through a dispensaries has to be tested for safety and potency. So on the safety side that’s mold, mildew, and pesticide testing and then on the potency side it’s the amount of THC and CBD for flowers. The percentage in those products and for finished products like hash oil concentrates or edibles the total amount of THC and CBD has to be determined and so as a consequence it’s very easy for us to dose our edibles.

We have edibles like hard candies and chocolates and savory snacks and we know the dosages is between 4 mg per candy up to 40 or 140 and so we encourage people to find their dose and through some experimentation everybody can quite easily figure out how much cannabis is appropriate for them in an edible dosage form and so we find our clients really enjoying their consumption of cannabis as an edible because it may be more discrete or actually we just might be more long lasting and have a different physical or an emotional effect on themselves. So edibles are great. We can sell them. I would characterize edibles as maybe 25% of our business and unfortunately we won’t be able to sell them to adults 21 and over.

Matthew: Right just for medical then and is there talk of changing that or is it too early to say?

Jeremy: There’s no discussion that I’m aware of regarding such change. I think that there’s been some edible hysteria in the media and then some of that are from instances in Colorado or there’s even an instance here in Central Oregon where a woman called the ambulance for her friend because she had three candies and felt herself getting really, really sick, and so I think there’s been some media hysteria but like anything else when somebody; like alcohol if you’re learning to drink alcohol you don’t introduce your friend to alcohol and provide them with a fifth of Tequila.

Matthew: Right.

Jeremy: Somebody is going to get sick with alcohol well the same thing can happen with cannabis. We’re aware of that and if you introduce cannabis to somebody who’s already drunk then the likelihood of them having a negative first experience is pretty darned good, but we encourage people to try edibles with a 3 to 5 mg dose. We have a line of medicated ginger-ale’s called Magic Numbers and they come in a 3 mg, a 10mg, and a 25mg bottle, and so I personally know based on my size and metabolism that 3 mg is perfect and it’s really awesome because I can drink a whole bottle and feel like a complete human that I’ve finished my beverage and I feel a nice effect without feeling debilitated in any way and other individuals that have a different size, stature, and metabolism will want 10 mg or 25 mg dose.

We have a line of medicated (28:40 Cambushas?) that have 15 mgs per bottle and so people can find their dose. You realize well drink a third of the bottle and your good or two thirds and your fine and so we have the ability to control our dosages if we’re conscientious about it and ultimately that’s what we’re talking about here. We’re trying to sell cannabis to adult consumers who are rational, who are self aware, who are responsible and idiots are going to do stupid things with anything. There are people who self medicate or who over medicate with sugar and caffeine and have eating disorders and all sorts of problems and cannabis isn’t going to prevent somebody from abusing it but for the other ninety-nine. something percent of humanity they’re going to be fine with their choice of consumption of cannabis as a smoked or vaped flower in an edible form or in a hash oil concentrate.

Matthew: Did you find yourself educating new customers about the endocannabinoid system and if so how do you introduce that subject to them?

Jeremy: I would characterize our audience as maybe one third really well knowledgeable about the plant and their consumption of the plant and they come to use seeking variety, different novel dosage forms from edibles and concentrates as well, and I would say there’s another third of our audience that has a relationship to cannabis but they’re not trying to learn more about its use and different ways that they can incorporate cannabis and different types of cannabis into their overall health and wellness and then there’s another third of our clientele that are absolutely new to cannabis.

So two thirds of our audience is seeking knowledge, they’re seeking education and consultation about how cannabis can be used more appropriately, and so we do talk about the endocannabinoid system and that’s often where we lead in the conversation because a lot of time folks are seeking an answer because Western medicine has typically said okay if you take this product your headache will go away, if you take this product your belly ache will go away and so some folks are seeking sort of that clear cut black or white answer. With cannabis I want a strain that provides me with this sense of relief and we’re very honest and we recognize that everybody has an endocannabinoid system that’s very different and that endocannabinoid receptor cell or the endocannabinoid receptors are in our cell walls. They are our nerve endings and therefore cannabis is a smart plant and it will go.

The cannabis oils are cannabinoids we’ll go to where the body needs it most. That could be in your gut? That could be in your head? It could be in sort of the neuropathic pain in your feet and so we are always encouraging people and folks to try and experiment with different types of cannabis because the different ratios in the cannabinoids are going to react differently to everybody and often when we’re in a trade room and there’s a number of individuals whether it’s our staff or our clients we’re honest and say hey all of us can consume the same cannabis plant but it’s going to produce a different reaction. It might make you sleepy Matt, it might make me wanna go reorganize all the tubbys in my garage, and it might open somebody’s heart and inspire them to write love letters to their love; their friends and family and loved ones.

So the endocannabinoid system is complex and has recently discovered and all of us have a very unique one and so it’s; again we’re using our own bodies as an experiment to find out what works best for us and when.

Matthew: Are topicals in the same category as infused products or are they allowed for adult use or is it medical how does that work?

Jeremy: So topicals ironically are considered an infused or a concentrated dosage form of cannabis and will not be available to sell to adult consumers in October just a quarter ounce of bud is all we’re going to be able to sell with respect to cannabis products to adults. We find a lot of our clients using topicals very successfully and I.

Matthew: What are the symptoms? Would you say they’re using them for?

Jeremy: Well we opened our doors about a year and a half ago and I had no idea how many in our culture suffered from migraines and insomnia and we have a lot of clients who will use topicals before; while their sensing themselves getting a migraine. They’ll rub topical salve on their temples to prevent the onset of the migraine and they say they wake up feeling a lot better maybe 90% better with a lot of the migraine being avoided and we also see clients using topicals applying it to sore parts of their body from places where they have achy muscles or joint pain and their finding tremendous relief from salves or from roll on oils that are infused with cannabis oils; often blends of different cannabis oils as well as a blend of other healing herbs and healing oils. We see clients using topical lotions and salves to address a variety of different symptoms.

Matthew: How about patients do they consume cannabis leaves by juicing? Is that something you hear of?

Jeremy: We do hear of that quite a lot and what we often will do for clients who are seeking leaf to juice we will just try and introduce them to growers or cultivators directly because it’s a very time sensitive product. If somebody does a lot of defanning or defan leafing in their garden those families need to get into the juicer immediately and because what I had indicated earlier everything that comes in our facility has to be tested by an analytical firm for safety and potency it would be prohibitively costly to have a big bag of leaf tested for mold and pesticides as well as potency because the amount of juice. You get two ice cube; an ice cube tray potentially worth of juice. So it’s not really economical or viable for us to do that through our facility but because we’re a community agency and a community dispensary we just introduce patients to growers and through the original sharing model growers will just share their leaves directly with patients and we hear amazing stories about the benefits of the juiced leaf. It’s very high in THCA which is the acidic form of THC. It’s non psychoactive and we hear a lot of folks benefiting tremendously with respect to their digestive systems and their overall health and well being.

Matthew: Now a lot of people listening would like to hear more about cannabis from their doctor but their doctors are not really bringing up the subject. Is there; do you have any suggestions on how to initiate that conversation with their medical doctor?

Jeremy: Be forthright. There’s nothing wrong or illegal about discussing medical cannabis with a doctor under the (36:38 Conna?) decision the federal courts have already ruled that doctors and patients have a confidentiality and therefore they have the ability to discuss medical cannabis and certainly recommend it to their patients. Doctors are very I think accustomed to patients bringing ideas to them about different treatment options and preferences and cannabis therapeutics shouldn’t be any different. The challenge is that many doctors are unfamiliar with cannabis or dosing with cannabis and therefore might be hesitant to recommend it so a patient should bring in documentation, research about cannabis used medically as well as some documentation that describes or information that would be beneficial for the physician to understand how the patient has been using cannabis with benefit or what they hear about other patients using cannabis for.

There is a organization that does a lot of great work in policy called “Americans For Safe Access” and they have a website called www.safeaccessnow.org and there are articles out of their website that talk about how to talk to your doctor about cannabis and we often encourage our own clients or folks that call us on the phone or walk in our door and say hey I want to; I’m interested in learning more about medical cannabis and I want to get a recommendation and I don’t know who to go and who to talk to and we always encourage folks to speak to their primary care physicians first and foremost and have that conversation with their physician because I would think that physicians want to know what their patients are using because it might affect their regular prescribing habits. Certain medications are dampened with the use of cannabis and then others have the opposite effect and so a physician may want to dial up certain types of medications or dial them down if they know that cannabis is being used in concert with ongoing treatment. And we recognize that not every physician is going to be comfortable recommending cannabis because of their own morals or because of their own sense of comfort and knowledge about the plant and there are often alternative; there are other doctors that are cannabis specialists that will then be willing to be engaged with a patient to see if cannabis could be appropriate for their consumption and their use medically.

Matthew: Great points Jeremy. In closing how can listeners learn more about Bloom Well?

Jeremy: We always love it when people come right into our facility but knowing that not everybody is in Bend, Oregon we do have a website which is www.bloomwellbend.com and we can also be found on Instagram and other social media places like Facebook, we’re on Leafly as well and a quick search for bloomwellbend will find us on any of the social media sites as well.

Matthew: Great. Jeremy thanks so much for being on CannaInsider today. We really appreciate it.

Jeremy: Oh it’s been a pleasure.

Matthew: : If you enjoyed the show today, please consider leaving us a review on iTunes, Stitcher or whatever app you might be using to listen to the show. Every five star review helps us to bring the best guests to you. Learn more at www.cannainsider.com/itunes. What are the five major trends that will impact the cannabis industry in the next five years? Find out with your free report at www.cannainsider.com/trends. Have a suggestion for an awesome guest on www.cannainsider.com, simply send us an email at feedback at cannainsider.com. We would love to hear from you.

Some quick disclosures and disclaimers, me your host works with the ArcView Group and promotional consideration may or may not be given to CannaInsider for the ads placed in the show. Also please do not take any information from CannaInsider or its guests as medical advice. Contact your licensed physician before taking cannabis or using it for medical treatments. Lastly the host or guests on CannaInsider may or may not invest in the companies or entrepreneurs profiled on the show. Please consult your licensed financial advisor before making any investment decisions.

Join CannaInsider For FREE & Receive
The Five Disruptive Trends Shaping The Cannabis Industry Now