The Cannabis Technology & Media Conference Called New West Summit

Jim McAlpine is the Executive Director of The New West Summit. Jim and Matthew discuss how Jim’s Bay Area conference is attracting the best and brightest in cannabis tech and media.

Key Takeaways:
[1:03] – What’s the New West Summit
[1:20] – Jim’s background
[2:45] – Jim talks about the first New West Summit
[5:18] – The experience of a New West Summit
[6:57] – Unique things at the New West Summit
[9:30] – What are the 420 Games
[14:08] – Jim gives a shout out to businesses that attended New West Summit
[17:26] – Jim talks about big opportunities for entrepreneurs in the market
[19:03] – What’s Powerhouse Gym
[21:59] – Jim talks about the California government affairs
[25:33] – How to be a successful exhibitor at a New West Summit
[27:12] – Jim answers some personal development questions
[30:08] – Contact details for New West Summit

Read Full Transcript

As the cannabis market continues its upward surge into the billions of dollars in revenue, many businesses and entrepreneurs are trying to understand how technology can enable and accelerate business success. Jim McAlpine created the New West Summit to highlight and bring together those that are creating the technological change in the cannabis space. Jim, welcome to CannaInsider.

Jim: Thanks for having me. I’m a big fan of your podcast.

Matthew: Thank you. Give us a sense of geography. Where are you in the world today?

Jim: Currently I’m in lovely Northern California, in particular, Marin County. I also work in the ski industry and spend a lot of time in Lake Tahoe, but I’m in Marin today.

Matthew: Okay. What’s the New West Summit, at a high level?

Jim: It’s a B2B conference that focuses on technology, media and investment in the cannabis space.

Matthew: Okay. You mentioned you’re involved in the ski industry, but tell us more about your background and why you created the New West Summit.

Jim: Well, so, I’ve been an entrepreneur my whole life. For about 20 years I’ve owned and run a company called, Snowbound.com, which is an internet based company that offers ticketing services and marketing services for the ski industry. That’s kind of what made me jump into the cannabis space because the snow stopped falling out here in Northern California for several years, four straight years and really impacted our business in the snow industry. I kind of call it the one positive thing for me that came out of the drought, which it inspired me to get into this amazing industry of cannabis.

Matthew: Yeah. I skied heavenly in Squaw Valley and I really enjoyed that, some years back, but is the snow finally returned now this year?

Jim: Yeah, this year’s been an amazing year. Actually more snow than we’ve seen in decades up in Lake Tahoe. Yeah, we had a great year finally again, so that will be good for Snowbound. Cannabis and skiing go together pretty well. I like to merge both of those worlds together.

Matthew: Yeah. You can really smell it in Colorado when you’re behind someone on the ski lift. There’s this draft as you go up the mountain.

Jim: That’s not just in Colorado. I’m sure it’s more in Colorado.

Matthew: You had your first New West Summit a short time back. Where was that and what was it like?

Jim: The first New West Summit was two years ago. It was in 2015. It was at the Park 55 Hotel in San Francisco. It was great. Our first event was really well received, because there wasn’t anything like what we did in the industry, focusing on the tech aspects. It really went well. Last year we did it at the Hyatt Regency at San Francisco, and then this year we’ve moved it over to the Marriot and the Oakland Convention Center in Oakland because we’ve grown out of the space of the others.

Matthew: Wow. Oakland’s really transformed quite a bit too over the years. I remember the first time I went there. It was sketchy. This was years ago, but it’s really kind of transformed. How have you seen it change?

Jim: First of all San Francisco is I think the most expensive city in the country. It’s surpassed New York. It’s incredibly expensive to live in San Francisco. I think a lot of people began to look at Oakland as an option to not have to pay as much. Truthfully Oakland, more so than San Francisco, is the center in Northern California or California of the cannabis industry. It’s just over the water, but Oakland is really—Harbor Side is there, and it’s kind of been the real center in the Bay Area of the cannabis movement.

Matthew: If you’re a nerd like me, you look at a seismology map and it’s bright red in Oakland. If there’s an earthquake, Oakland is going down. Would you agree with that?

Jim: When you live in earthquake country you’re not scared of earthquakes, but you’re terrified of hurricanes and tornados and all that. I’ve been through many. I was at the World Series when the big one hit here. We don’t really think about it too much, to be honest with you.

Matthew: I lived in Chile for a time and experienced many earthquakes, and I’m still nervous about them. So, you got one on me. That’s good. You must be properly medicated. Is that what it is?

Jim: No, no. I have not medicated this morning yet, but it’s just one of those things. We grew up our whole lives here doing earthquake drills and all that. You just get kind of used to it. I’m sure that the people that live in hurricane, like I said, are way more scared of earthquakes, and they know they just go into their basement and wait it out. You just get used to it, used to what you’re living around I guess.

Matthew: Yeah, I grew up with tornadoes, and they didn’t bother me, but they freak people out that aren’t used to them.

Jim: The thought of a tornado scares the hell out of me. So, you got me beat on that one.

Matthew: Describe a little bit what people experience. If I was a fly on the wall at a New West Summit, what’s it like? What am I hearing? What am I seeing?

Jim: It’s really been the first conference to focus with a laser on technology, and how that technology will be the driver of the future of this industry in every aspect. It looks like a typical conference. It’s got panel tracks. It’s got exhibiters and keynotes and all that kind of stuff. The real differentiator to me is that we focus graduate level curriculum versus the one-on-one curriculum you see at a lot of other shows. Instead of how to open a dispensary, we’re going to have drilled down speakers and topics on agri tech, hydro tech, lighting tech, distribution technologies, point of sale systems. It’s just definitively a little bit more complex than some of the other conferences. The brighter minds of the industry have picked up, and I think that’s what’s kind of made people like us and separated us from the other shows.

Matthew: So you’re kind of skipping the base of the pyramid. You assume when people come to New West that they know what the introductory topics are and kind of assimilated that and digested it already.

Jim: Yeah exactly. I was just going to say, it’s not that beginners aren’t welcome, but yeah this whole curriculum has been fashioned for people what have at least a decent baseline, if not a strong baseline, of cannabis understanding in most aspects.

Matthew: What experiences do you try to weave in the Summit in order to have people walking away talking about or having something they want to talk about? What do they see that they can’t see anywhere else?

Jim: What I’ve tried to do is weave in non-endemic cannabis companies, and more so non-endemic speakers to the cannabis industry. An example is last year we had Susan Bennett who is the voice of Siri on the iPhone come and speak about her experience in the tech field of recording all that stuff, and there was some fun cannabis integration of that talk. We had Richard Branson last year, who kind of gave more of an all encompassing talk about the global legalization potential of cannabis. Really having people come from outside of cannabis and that are successful technology disrupters. Having speakers come from Salesforce, from Uber, from Go Pro helmet cam, and really talk about those fundamental philosophies of how to move the needle using technology. I think that really separates us too because usually at other shows it’s just the same names that you see and it’s all cannabis people. So, bringing big business and successful companies and speakers in from outside, I think really excites people, and they hear new information that’s going to help them. That’s another reason I think people separate us as kind of a graduate level curriculum, if you will.

Matthew: Well, well done getting Richard Branson to come to your event. That’s really got to be a big draw. Is that hard to get someone of that caliber to come? How does that work?

Jim: Yeah. Richard actually Skyped a live Skype from Necker Island, and did a speech and a Q&A session. He did it as a favor for us. His feed to speak is very, very expensive. He was a cool enough guy that he saw what we were doing and we didn’t have the money to pay his usual speaking fee, so he worked with us for less because he cares about this whole industry.

Matthew: That’s cool.

Jim: He’s a great guy. He’s an idol of mine for sure.

Matthew: Yeah, me too. He’s kind of like a business leader, Gandhi and Yoda all wrapped up into one. He seems to have achieved success not just in business, but in other areas.

Jim: Yes, spiritually. I’m the 420 Games Guy and Richard’s a great outdoor adventurer and athlete. So that’s another thing that I like about him is he gets out kite surfing and does some cool stuff.

Matthew: Any chance you’re going to make it to Necker Island?

Jim: That is definitely on my bucket list. I plan to someday make it there, yes.

Matthew: Gosh. That sounds like a great experience there. Well you mentioned the 420 Games. What are the 420 Games?

Jim: The 420 Games were actually my first foray into this industry, when I decided to jump in. In simple format, they’re athletic events formulated to destigmatize both the plant cannabis and the people that use it via athletic achievement. We tour around the country. This year we have eight events in six different states, seven different states. They’re 4.20 mile runs. So they kind of look like your typical 5k advocacy runs, whether it was for breast cancer or a woman’s right for abortion or whatever it may be. These are just advocacy runs, and we don’t smoke at the events. They’re family friendly. There’s kids out there. It’s really to change that perception of if you use marijuana, that you’re a stoner.

Matthew: Yeah. We had Seibo Shen, CEO of VapeXhale, on the show and he talked about how he sees a lot of NFL athletes, MMA athletes who are cannabis enthusiasts. What’s your experience around athletes at that level consuming cannabis?

Jim: (A) Seibo is one of my best friends. He’s actually an amazing athlete and a jujitsu guy and is pretty high level himself. There’s so many athletes that’ I’ve met through the 420 Games and that are advocating for acceptance of cannabis. In particular, I was just out at Harvard medical school and I moderated a panel with Ricky Williams. Eban Britton, Nate Jackson and Lance Johnstone who are all ex-NFL players, as well as a couple of doctors. We had about 400 doctors in the room listening to us speak on cannabis as an alternative for opiates, because many NFL players are forced to take opiates because of their injuries and they’re not allowed to use cannabis and become addicted.

It was a really forward moving thing to have these doctors at Harvard really intently listening to us and asking questions, and you can tell they were engaged. I think having these athletes that have come onboard really helps move the needle because people really want to listen, and they respect someone who is a professional athlete in a different way than if it was you or me talking about it.

Matthew: Yeah, the NFL athletes really seem to be trying to get the message out there lately. Does it sound like that message is being well received, apart from the doctors in the room?

Jim: Yeah. Unfortunately the one guy that needs to get it is Rodger Goodell. We also did the same similar panel at the Super Bowl literally to address the NFL and Roger Goodell to get them to hear our message. So, I think across the board the football players are putting out a really articulate message, which is also important. They’re all really smart guys that I’ve worked with that share the message about what cannabis can be as medicine in a way that people hear and take in that changes their opinions if they’re doubters. Yeah I think having these professional athletes, even outside of football, it’s been focused on the CT and concussion stuff in the NFL. As Seibo was talking about, these fighters are out there taking big head hits, and a lot of the UFC guys have become big advocates for cannabis as well. Joe Rogan talks about it all the time. I think almost in all sports it’s becoming looked at as an alternative for pain relief versus taking pharmaceuticals, which at the root of it makes me really happy to see people understand that this is medicine and not just something we use to get high.

Matthew: So, you’re seeing it more as pain management than performance enhancements, just in anecdotal experience?

Jim: Yeah, absolutely. I think athletes use cannabis. When I speak about this I always talk about the two genres of use. It’s focus and recovery. Myself, I like to use cannabis before I go skiing or surfing or on a bike ride. It really just helps me in the gym too to stay focused and enjoy what I’m doing more, instead of feeling the pain and being like oh this sucks, I want to quit. It makes me more engaged. The other side of it is what you mentioned and I think more people use it for, which is recovery. Instead of putting a pill in your mouth, you can use a cannabis topical, you can use pills. You don’t have to smoke, or you can smoke, and all of those ways bring relief to athletes after they’ve hurt their muscles or they’ve got sore joints.

Matthew: Is there a couple businesses or entrepreneurs you want to highlight that were at the last New West Summit that you think are noteworthy that you can tell us a little bit about?

Jim: Yeah, absolutely. To start off I’ll say, when we first started this two years ago, the delivery company Ease really stood out with their deliver app. That was something that seemed to really blow people’s mind that you could order your cannabis on your iPhone and someone would knock on your door to deliver it within 10 or 15 minutes. I think at the first one the delivery apps and that kind of stuff really stood out, and it’s been fun to watch the progression. This last year it was more on the growth side.

There’s three companies that would stick out in my head. There’s a company called Flourish Farms. They have these really interesting lighting pods. In essence you can grow outdoor with indoor controls, and there are these pods that allow you to basically put the pods over the plants and they refract light through these kind of solar like panels and bring all of the outdoor true sunlight into your plant while protecting it from the elements. It can almost amplify the sunlight. It’s an amazing way to increase the efficiencies of outdoor grows, and there’s a huge amount of interest in that.

There was a company called Grownetics that’s really an automated grow tech system that helps people with adjusting their lighting or their CO2 or whatever it is in their grow. That seemed to work really well. It had a lot of people interested in it. The last one was Flow Hub. It’s a seed to sale company and point of sale company out of Colorado, that really seems to be challenging and bringing perhaps a better product to the market than the MJ Freeways and other point of sale systems out there right now. It’s been cool to see the shift of focus. At first it was the apps and the integrative stuff to order your marijuana, and now it’s been focusing more on, or more interest on the actual grow tech in the last year.

Matthew: That’s cool. I actually went to the offices of the Flow Hub guys, and they said we want to show you how to use the software, but instead of explaining it to you, they just put this device in my hand and said, use this to move a plant from this room to this room. They had me doing it like that (snaps), out of the box without any training or anything. I thought that was pretty revolutionary what they were doing there. That’s interesting.

Jim: Yeah absolutely. The guys that created Firefly, the vaporizer, came from Apple and I recently read that Apple has a couple of patents on vaporizers. I’m excited for the day where we can have Apple with their vaporizer at the New West Summit, and truly integrate the worlds of tech and cannabis by having a company like Apple making products for us.

Matthew: Gosh, that would be cool if they did something like that, but at the same time it seems like they’re a little conservative. It might be a few years before they do something like that, but they do have a patent, so they’re obviously working on it.

Jim: Yeah, who knows. The future is bright, they say. So, I’m waiting and excited to see what comes out.

Matthew: If you were going to clone yourself and create a business in the tech space, some product or service apart from New West Summit, do you have any ideas that you want to throw out there for entrepreneurs that you see big opportunities if they can address some aspect of the market?

Jim: I think looking for—my philosophy in business has always been what is a solution that’s not as good as it needs to be. Instead of being the guy that invents something from the ground up, I’ve always like to say, here’s something that’s pretty cool, but it could be a lot cooler, and take that kind of head start. I think in the cannabis industry there are many companies, I’m not going to name anybody, but across the board from each sect of the cannabis industry, whether it’s the grow side, it’s the dispensary side, it’s the distribution side or any of the other tech stuff, there’s a lot of opportunity where people aren’t doing things quite to the A plus level yet. If someone’s out there with a good idea but they’re not doing it right, that’s really to me an amazing opportunity to step in and quickly make a difference. My philosophy has always been look around, see who’s doing something, but not doing it well that you could do better. Again, I don’t want to say any names, but there’s a lot of things out there that are not yet to the level they need to be, which means there’s a lot of opportunity for people that understand tech.

Matthew: Yeah that’s a good point. Alleviate a pain point, rather than create a new market. There is some incumbance in different areas of the tech scene in cannabis that just happened to be first on the scene, but are not necessarily the best or optimal that could be displaced pretty readily, if they understand the pain point. Tell us a little bit about Powerhouse Gym. What’s that?

Jim: Power Plant Fitness, that’s another one of our ventures in the cannabis athletic space.

Matthew: Power Plant Fitness, sorry about that.

Jim: That’s okay. No problem. I think there is a Powerhouse Gym from back in the day, kind of like a Gold’s or something. Power Plant obviously a double (19.22 unclear) there. We’re still raising money. It’s been an arduous process. When Donald Trump and Jeff Sessions came into power here a lot of the traditional money that we were expecting to come in for that venture got pulled back, because they were scared of the administration. So, I’m still currently raising funds for Power Plant Fitness. We’ve got a location in San Francisco that we would like to get opened here by the end of the year. It’s been one of those slow going raises that hasn’t happened as quickly as we would like. So, we’re still in that raising money phase.

Matthew: Yeah I’ve heard that feedback across the board that Jeff Session’s appointment was like a huge wet blanket. Things are still going on, but it just slowed everything down because no one wants to invest until they see. I think they’re seeing that perhaps he’s not as bad as they thought, but it’s still not clear.

Jim: I think he’s as bad as we all thought, but I don’t think he’s going to be as powerful as he hopes he could be. So that’s the way I look at it. To me what Jeff Sessions has done, for me, he made the big, real money investors back off, but in the big picture it’s not going to kill California, Oregon, Washington or the legal states, but what it’s going to sadly do is slow down the legalization in the states that need it and that aren’t there yet. I feel badly for those states that were getting close to legalization. With Sessions in office, I think it’s going to slow that down and probably have to come later. Later in the next administration for the states that don’t have any form of medical or recreational cannabis legal yet.

Matthew: I mean, I know you’re not a government expert or anything like that, but I was just reading yesterday that 250,000 tax payers left California last year, and it’s kind of a state of dichotomies in that you’ve got really wealthy tech investors and smart people that know how to make a lot of money. Then there’s the other side of that where there’s a lot of people not making much money there. The middle class seems to be leaving the state, from what I’m reading, largely because the high income tax rate. I think the top wants 13 percent. Just really high real estate prices, and a state government that’s not very business friendly. Do you see California, in the next ten years, having a positive outcome as these pension benefits spiral out of control and the state budget deficits get larger, or do you think it’s a non-issue that will resolve itself somehow?

Jim: It’s hard to say. I think California definitely has a bit of a mess on its hands, especially in the class system and the financial disparities that we have. I’m living right in the middle of it, and I’ve personally thought about leaving the state just because it’s so expensive here. I love living in California, and they say you get what you pay for, but it’s starting to hit that point where it almost doesn’t make sense trying to keep up with the Jones’ down here. I really don’t know. The one thing I do know is I’m a huge fan of Gavin Newsom, I’ve supported his campaign and been to his fundraisers. So, I would love to get Gavin, as he’s cannabis friendly and a forward moving, really strong thinker. Gavin is going to have his hands full. I think he’ll be the one to fix California, if we can do that. I wish I had the answers to those things, but I don’t really.

Matthew: I don’t know. If the Bay Area could somehow secede from the state of California, I think it would be a marvel. Something crazy would happen there between the technology and the capital and the innovative thinking. It would just go, it would become its own universe.

Jim: Yeah, no. It is crazy living here to see how much progression and things that are going on. It’s a really exciting place to be. To kind of turn the corner here, talking just outside of states and now talking countries, I’ve been really interested in Justin Trudeau and Canada and the opportunities up there in the cannabis industry, as we move forward. I think a lot of the investment money in the US that was going to go into US companies has began to go north into Canada.

Matthew: Yeah, it really is much easier there in Canada with the banking being legal. I think the only missing piece and the raising capital, those two things, but the only missing piece is dispensaries. Now I know they have dispensaries in Vancouver, but they’re essentially illegal. If they went away from this male-only thing, I think that would be huge. That would be the final missing puzzle piece that would just move the whole pole of the cannabis universe to Canada. So, with you on that. The population seems to have accepted it more. We have two poles in the US where we have people who totally accept it, and then it seems like people are against it. I mean I guess we’re winning some over into the acceptance side, but Canada seems more moderate about it. That could just be my perception.

Jim: I agree with you. There’s some disparities and weirdness in the laws with the dispensaries. I know there’s a lot of ones that were opening and getting shut down and just a bad, gray area. I think they’re addressing that now and moving into next year, that’s not going be a big issue in Canada. I’ve been excited to have a lot of the bigger Canadian companies start to come down to New West because they know that a lot of investors come to our events and they’re looking for American money now. So, the Canadian companies know that the American investors are interested in them, and because of that we’ve seen an influx of Canadian companies this year signing up for New West Summit. Honestly I don’t think we’ll get him, but I put in a request to see if Justin Trudeau would be able to come speak at New West Summit. I’m not holding any high hopes on that, but he would be an amazing guy to come talk as well.

Matthew: Oh yeah, that would be great. Now what do exhibitors achieve, what kind of exposure do they get? How do you become a successful exhibitor at a New West Summit and get the most out of it?

Jim: I think the first question is what are you looking for out of being an exhibitor. When I sell a booth that’s what I ask people. What do you want out of this show? Many bigger companies are just looking for branding and for people to know their name and see their name everywhere. Smaller companies many times are looking for an ROI. If they’re going to spend X, they need to make X back in new business from the event. Across the board I think the biggest things would be potentially meeting investors, as there’s a lot of investors at tech conferences. You see a lot of those kind of bigger money, traditional VC guys at our events sniffing around to try and figure out the landscape. So I think investment is a big one.

A lot of the growers and dispensary owners and people that are the executives of the industry are there. Those guys are looking for opportunities, whether it’s a new point of sale system like Flow Hub or it’s a new lighting system. So, a lot of the companies coming there are there poised to do business, and they do a lot of business. Our first year of New West Summit blew me away. One of the extractor companies, Genius Extractions, did over a quarter million dollars of business at our show in two days.

Matthew: Wow. That’s great.

Jim: Yeah, I mean, that’s what we want to do is put both sides in the room. The people providing the technology but also the people that want to purchase and use that technology.

Matthew: Jim, I like to ask some personal development questions to let listeners get a better sense of who you are personally. With that, is there a book that has had a big impact on your life or way of thinking that you would like to share with listeners?

Jim: I shouldn’t admit this, but I’m not a huge reader. I love reading magazines and short stuff, but I’m not a big, long book reader, but the ones that have kind of kept my attention and that I remember, I think the most impactful book for me that I’ve read has been called The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, by Dr. Stephen Covey. It’s been really good for me as an entrepreneur to just have some baselines of how to operate. That book goes outside of business and is philosophically on how to live your life and be successful. I’ve always tended to, I don’t want to use the word self-help, but I like reading books that teach me something.

Matthew: Yeah, I still think about that book all the time because he has these four quadrants where the things—Two of the quadrants I remember. There’s important and urgent and another one was urgent, but not important. I’m thinking to myself, yes, this thing has come up on my schedule or has popped into my life for some reason. It seems urgent, but it’s not important. You can just choose to ignore those things. You don’t have to do them. Instead focus on the things that are important and just take care of them. Because if it’s not important, what does it matter if it’s urgent?

Jim: Absolutely. That makes me think about my email inbox that’s way too flooded and not trying to get back to every email. I’m starting to realize you need to pick and choose your battles. You can’t get back to everybody. That book, and I live by lists. My biggest tool personally for success is just having a pad of paper and every day I write a list of what I want to accomplish. It’s funny, if I do something that wasn’t on the list, I’ll write it on the list and cross it out just so I can see that I did that and feel more accomplished. I think just the very simple task of list making is really important and most successful people do that.

Matthew: Yeah, I like the list too. I have one that kind of syncs with my phone and my laptop. I wonder sometimes if I put too much on the list. Do you have a lot of things on there, or do you try to keep it down to two or three things, but somehow it seems to grow?

Jim: Yeah, I’ve got a little note pad. I try to make it never be more than one page, I guess is the best way to put it. Like you said, I try and pick the stuff that’s important and prioritize it, so I’ve got the less important stuff below and the most important stuff at the top, and if I don’t get to the bottom, that’s okay.

Matthew: Okay. As we close, can you tell listeners how they learn more about New West Summit, both when the next one is and how to register, how to become and how to connect with you in general?

Jim: Yeah absolutely. Before I do that, I would love to share one other thing. You had asked me an earlier question just about different ideas and New West Summit. What I’m starting to see at New West Summit and really excited to see more of, and as we talk about technology on a podcast like yours, hemp is such an amazing piece of the cannabis industry that not a lot of people are looking at right now because it’s more about the cannabis as a plant, using it recreationally or medicinally. That piece of cannabis and the hemp industry in and of itself is going to be, in my opinion, the next big rush in this industry that a lot of people aren’t looking at or thinking about.

Everyone knows that you can make paper, but you can make hemp fuel and replace petroleum. You can use hempcrete. You can build houses and fuel your car with hemp. I just wanted to iterate to everybody out there that it’s great to smoke marijuana or eat it or use it however you want to use it for that benefit, but the plant itself has so many more things that it’s going to go for us in society and humanity over the next few decades that I think a lot of people are going to be surprised and have their eyes opened at the possibility of hemp, and I wanted to make sure to share that today.

Matthew: Yeah, hemp is kind of the behind the scenes celebrity. I’ve read how Mercedes is making door panels and bumpers out of hemp resins now. As supply chains for different products try to become more transparent and sustainable, they’re using hemp and resins and things like that for industrial uses. You mentioned hempcrete. Hemp insulation, that’s a big one too. So many uses, so you’re right. It’s kind of the hidden star, hidden game changer. Hemp.

Jim: Yeah, so thank you for letting me share that at the end here because I think that’s important for people to begin to think about and look into. On the New West Summit it’s pretty straight forward. It’s just www.newwestsummit.com.

Matthew: Well Jim, thanks so much for coming on today and educating us about your events. They sound like a lot of fun and good luck with Power Plant and the 420 Games.

Jim: Thank you so much. I’ve enjoyed being on your podcast.

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